The Pineapple (Ananas comosus), named for its resemblance to the pine cone, is a tropical plant with edible multiple fruit consisting of coalesced berries, and the most economically significant plant in the Bromeliaceae family. Pineapples may be cultivated from a crown cutting of the fruit, possibly flowering in 20–24 months and fruiting in the following six months. Pineapple does not ripen significantly post-harvest.

Pineapples are consumed both fresh and cooked, canned, or juiced, and are found in a wide array of cuisines including dessert, fruit salad, jam, yogurt, ice cream and candy—and as a complement to meat dishes. In addition to consumption, in the Philippines the pineapple’s leaves are used to produce the textile fiber piña- employed as a component of wall paper and furnishings, amongst other uses.

Nutrition

Raw pineapple is an excellent source of manganese (76% Daily Value (DV) in a one US cup serving) and vitamin C (131% DV per cup serving).[13] Mainly from its stem, pineapple contains a proteolytic enzyme, bromelain, which breaks down protein. If having sufficient bromelain content, raw pineapple juice may be used as a meat marinade and tenderizer. Pineapple enzymes can interfere with the preparation of some foods, such as jelly or other gelatin-based desserts, but would be destroyed during cooking and canning. The quantity of bromelain in the fruit is probably not significant, being mostly in the inedible stalk. Furthermore, an ingested enzyme like bromelain is unlikely to survive intact the proteolytic processes of digestion.

Cultivation

Southeast Asia dominates world production: in 2001, Thailand produced 1.979 million tons and the Philippines 1.618 million tons, while in the Americas Brazil produced 1.43 million tons. Total world production in 2001 was 14.220 million tons. The primary exporters of fresh pineapples in 2001 were Costa Rica, 322,000 tons; Côte d’Ivoire, 188,000 tons; and the Philippines, 135,000 tons. Since about 2000, the most common fresh pineapple fruit found in U.S. and European supermarkets is a low-acid hybrid that was developed in Hawaii in the early 1970s.

In commercial farming, flowering can be induced artificially, and the early harvesting of the main fruit can encourage the development of a second crop of smaller fruits. Once removed during cleaning, the top of the pineapple can be planted in soil and a new plant will grow. Slips and suckers are planted commercially.

About Pineapple

Spiny on the outside, sweet on the inside, pineapples are one fantastic fruit. Pineapples are members of the bromeliad family, and one of the few bromeliads to produce edible fruit, according to the biology department at Union County College. The fruit is actually made of many individual berries that fuse together around a central core. Each pineapple scale is an individual berry.

Pineapples’ nutritional benefits are as fascinating as their anatomy. “Pineapples contain high amounts of vitamin C and manganese”. These tropical treats are also a good way to get important dietary fiber and bromelain (an enzyme).

“As well as having high amounts of manganese, which is important for antioxidant defenses, pineapples also contain high amounts of thiamin, a B vitamin that is involved in energy production”.

For all its sweetness, one cup of pineapple chunks contains only 82 calories. Pineapples are also fat-free, cholesterol-free and low in sodium. Not surprisingly, they do contain sugar, with 16 grams per cup.

Here are the nutrition facts for raw pineapple, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which regulates food labeling through the National Labeling and Education Act:

Nutrition Facts

Serving size:
2 slices, 3″ diameter,
3/4″ thick
(4 oz / 112 g)

Calories 50
Calories from Fat 0

Bananas… are a staple in the tropics. Many varieties are grown, and the fruit is used in numerous ways. The fruit of the banana is technically a berry. As it grows, the cluster of fruit is called a hand and each banana is known as a finger. Since the plant only bears fruit once, it is cut down after harvest. The seeds are infertile, so shoots are used to start new plants. Bananas are grown throughout the tropics, and S&P most commonly imports this product from Thailand, India, the Philippines, Ecuador, and Costa Rica. Depending on the customer application, however, we can obtain bananas from other countries, as necessary.

Banana, Pisang.

Musa acuminata Colla; Musa balbisiana Colla; Musa x paradisiaca L.

Family of Musaceae.

Description & storage

Long thick-skinned edible fruit that is yellow when ripe.
Keep bananas on a fruit dish in the living room at room temperature. If you want the bananas to ripen faster place the bowl in the sun. Like other tropical fruits and tomatoes and bell peppers, never store bananas in the refrigerator. Below 8 degrees Celsius the fruit will decay from the inside. These fruits will not ripen but will turn black in the refrigerator.

Plant

Banana-plants can grow up to 15 m. but most plants vary from 3 to 9 m.
It has very big leafs that can grow to 4 x 1 m.

Short history

Wild forms of the banana plant come originally from the Indo-Malaysian area and are now cultivated all over the tropical and sub-tropical continents.

Use

Bananas are delicious eaten with one’s fingers after peeling off the skin. Depending on the type of banana unripe bananas are also cooked, fried or deep-fried a lot. Bananas are the basic food in many tropical countries

Types

At this moment there are five different types of bananas common on the market:

  • Red bananas: have a green/red peel and pink fruit flesh. They taste the same like yellow bananas. The redder a fruit, the more carotene it contains, so maybe they are healthier than their yellow colleagues;
  • Fruit-bananas: are the normal, yellow bananas, 15-30 cm.
  • Apple-bananas: are smaller, 8-10 cm., and ripen faster. They are also yellow;
  • The baby-banana (pisang susa): is yellow as well and measures 6-8 cm. It is the sweetest of the banana family;
  • Baking bananas: are 30 to 40 cm. large and are green, yellow or red-like. They cannot be eaten raw. They fulfill the role of the potato in the tropical countries.

Peculiar characteristics

  • Is the most well known and eaten (tropical) fruit;
  • In Eastern Africa you can buy banana beer. This beer is brewed from bananas;
  • Tropical fruit is usually picked unripe and has to ripen in the land of arrival. To make this process go faster bananas are treated with ethylene-gas. Nobananas also ripen through ethylene -gas but exposing it to additional gas accelerates the process;
  • Is the (only) fruit that for some people can work fatting because they contain a lot of starch (more starch than sugar). Those people shouldn’t eat too many bananas a day;
  • Eat at least one banana a day, they are said to contain everything a human needs and they contain all the 8 amino-acids our body cannot produce itself. For more see the energy in fruit.
  • Bananas are a good source of fiber, potassium and vitamin C;
  • Red bananas are often dried and converted to meal which is used in many ways;
  • Red bananas contain more vitamin C as yellow bananas (the redder a fruit, the more nutritious elements it contains)

Bananas

Bananas are one of the world’s most appealing fruits. Global banana exports reached about 18 million tons in 2015, according to the United Nations. About half of them went to the United States and the European market.

A wide variety of health benefits are associated with the curvy yellow fruit. Bananas are high in potassium and pectin, a form of fiber, said Laura Flores, a San Diego-based nutritionist. They can also be a good way to get magnesium and vitamins C and B6.

“Bananas are known to reduce swelling, protect against developing type-2 diabetes, aid in weight loss, strengthen the nervous system and help with production of white blood cells, all due to the high level of vitamin B6 that bananas contain,” Flores told Live Science.

10 Banana Health Benefits
  • Potassium. Potassium is an essential mineral which maintains proper heart function and regulates your blood pressure. …
  • Increased Energy. …
  • Improved Digestion. …
  • Cure for Ulcers & Heartburn. …
  • Vitamin B6. …
  • Skin Conditions. …
  • Other Vitamins & Minerals. …
  • A Cancer Fighter?